Cochrane News

Cochrane seeks Head of Editorial Policy and Research Integrity - remote

6 months 1 week ago

Specifications: Permanent – Full Time
Salary:  £60,000 per Annum (1.0 FTE)
Location: Remote – UK Based
Closing date: 04 September 2023

Cochrane is an international charity. For 30 years we have responded to the challenge of making vast amounts of research evidence useful for informing decisions about health. We do this by synthesising research findings and our work has been recognised as the international gold standard for high quality, trusted information.

Cochrane's strength is in its collaborative, global community. We have 110,000+ members and supporters around the world. Though we are spread out across the globe, our shared passion for health evidence unites us. Our Central Executive Team supports this work and is divided into four directorates: Evidence Production and Methods, Publishing and Technology, Development, and Finance and Corporate Services.

The Head of Editorial Policy and Research Integrity is responsible for Cochrane’s editorial policies and research integrity and methods standards. They will ensure Cochrane’s review production processes and systems support efficient and trusted review production, with a focus on improving author experience. This role involves editorial and operational leadership, working closely with colleagues across the Evidence Production & Methods and Publishing and Technology directorates to ensure Cochrane’s product development aligns with its strategic priorities.   

Don’t have every single qualification? We know that some people are less likely to apply for a job unless they are a perfect match. At Cochrane, we’re not looking for “perfect matches.” We’re looking to welcome people to our diverse, inclusive, and passionate workplace. So, if you’re excited about this role but don’t have every single qualification, we encourage you to apply anyway. Whether it’s this role or another one, you may be just the right candidate.

Our organization is built on four core values: Collaboration: Underpins everything we do, locally and globally. Relevant: The right evidence at the right time in the right format. Integrity: Independent and transparent. Quality: Reviewing and improving what we do, maintaining rigour and trust.  

You can expect: 

  • An opportunity to truly impact health globally  
  • A flexible work environment  
  • A comprehensive on boarding experiences
  • An environment where people feel welcome, heard, and included, regardless of their differences

Cochrane welcomes applications from a wide range of perspectives, experiences, locations and backgrounds; diversity, equity and inclusion are key to our values.

How to apply

  • For further information on the role and how to apply, please click here
  • The deadline to receive your application is 04th Sep, 2023.
  • The supporting statement should indicate why you are applying for the post, and how far you meet the requirements, using specific examples. 
  • Read our Recruitment Privacy Statement
Monday, August 21, 2023 Category: Jobs
Lydia Parsonson

Empowering Informed Choices: Cochrane China's innovative Knowledge Dissemination Competition

6 months 1 week ago

In healthcare, evidence-based information serves as the cornerstone of informed decision-making. Yet, the true impact of this knowledge lies in its accessibility and comprehensibility. Recognizing this, Cochrane China is running it's third annual competition that hopes to boost public interest in Cochrane reviews and fosters inventive pathways for sharing knowledge.

At the forefront of this endeavour is the Centre for Evidence-based Chinese Medicine at Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, a Cochrane China Network Affiliate that acts at the Translation and Dissemination Working Group. This Working Group, in collaboration with the Centre for Evidence-based Chinese Medicine of Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, the Cochrane China Network Affiliate acts as the Translation and Dissemination Working Group. This working group is jointly hosting the competition with the Center for Evidence-Based and Translational Medicine at Wuhan University, the Second School of Clinical Medicine at Wuhan University, and the dedicated members of the Cochrane China community.

Cochrane defines knowledge translation (KT) as the process of supporting the use of health evidence from our high-quality, trusted Cochrane reviews by those who need it to make health decisions. KT helps to make Cochrane evidence accessible and useful to everybody while advocating for evidence-informed health care.




We welcome you to submit a KT piece to this competition! 

Simplified Chinese:
Submissions need to be in Simplified Chinese. If you start in a different language, you can always translate it. It is helpful if one person in your team can communicate in Simplified Chinese as most communication by organizations around the competition will be in this language. 
Open to all:
All ages and geographical locations are welcome to enter.
Get creative: A wide range of creative formats is welcome;  past winners include pictures, written work, and videos. Some previous examples include this stop-motion video and these infographics.
Unite together: Participants can choose to submit their work either as individuals or as part of a team, allowing for diverse and collaborative contributions.
Deadline: The deadline for submissions is 30 August 2023. 
Winners: Winning submissions will be featured on the WeChat public website and the BUCM Essential Perspectives on Evidence-Based Medicine video channel. There are also branded prizes to be won!
Get in touch: Find out more information or  ask questions at ebmvolunteer@163.com

Join the WeChat account for more information: 

Monday, August 21, 2023
Muriah Umoquit

Engage in conversations with living 'books' at #CochraneLondon's Library of People

6 months 2 weeks ago

Cochrane UK is gearing up to host the much-anticipated Cochrane Colloquium at London's Queen Elizabeth II Centre (QEII) from September 4th to 6th, 2023. The event promises an enriching experience, combining learning, networking, and fun. The countdown has begun, but there is still time to register!  

On Wednesday, September 6th, during the lunch break, join us for the #CochraneLondon Library of People. This event offers a unique opportunity to engage in conversations with human 'books,' who possess rich life experiences to share. This informal and enjoyable setup offers a refreshing way to connect with others and gain fresh viewpoints.

At the Library of People, you can "borrow" individuals as if they were open books, delving into their narratives and have conversations about subjects that intrigue you. These interactions will take place within small groups, enabling meaningful discussions. Each "book" will come with a list of suggested questions to facilitate the conversation's outset. 

The Cochrane Book Club members will be your "Librarians," guiding you in the selection and discovery of your ideal "book". You'll encounter a rich variety of "books," representing diverse nationalities, various career stages, roles within the Cochrane community, and personal passions.

Mentee to Mentor - crossing continents Omolola Alade 

15,000km southeast of home (Ibadan, Nigeria) I was first introduced to evidence synthesis during a graduate course on Epidemiology at the University of Sydney, Australia. I struggled with homesickness, but distracted myself by interpreting forest plots and critical appraisals of systematic reviews.

Several years later, this time 10,000km northwest of home, having mastered homesickness, I became a mentee of the US Cochrane network. Working with mentors moved me from my distant, hesitant interest to being an active contributor to evidence synthesis. Now I am leading a research project, with seven other mentees, on equity considerations in mentoring programs for evidence synthesis.

Back home in Nigeria, I am part of an inaugural collaborative initiative between my faculty and the Nigerian Institute of Medical Research to conduct several systematic reviews on oral health. I am also a mentor to the next generation of oral health researchers in evidence synthesis, mentoring three researchers in the first cohort of the National Oral Health for Development programme of the Nigerian Institute of Medical Research. So, as you can see I have gone from mentee to mentor as I have travelled the world.

 

Translating best evidence to support disaster settings - Evidence Aid (born in Cochrane in 2004) Claire Allen

Like many others I sat transfixed by the dreadful events which unfolded on 26 December 2004 in the wake of the Indian ocean earthquake and tsunami. Like many others, I had no idea what we as a society, or indeed Cochrane (which I’d worked with since 1997), could do, apart from giving money. Thankfully Mike Clarke who was Chair of the Board of Trustees in Cochrane and other colleagues had the inspired idea that as an organisation, Cochrane was perfectly placed to provide robust information to help those who were supporting the relief effort in making their decisions. And, boom, Evidence Aid was born. I jumped ship from Cochrane to Evidence Aid formally in 2014. From then, Evidence Aid became an independent charity, working with many organisations such as Save the Children, the Pan American Health Organization, the World Health Organization and we were at the forefront of the information provision when the recent Covid pandemic hit the world, starting our efforts in February 2020, before lockdowns were started.

 

My experience as an early career professional and Cochrane Ana Beatriz Pizarro

I am a 25-year-old early career registered nurse hailing from a small town in the north of Colombia. As a first-generation college student, I take immense pride in being the youngest editorial board member representing The Early Career Professionals Group. My passion for evidence-based healthcare is reflected in my extensive work, having published over 30 systematic reviews.

My primary goal is to improve lives in the Global South through multidisciplinary approaches, understanding specific health-disease problems, their impact, and potential applications in public health.

Beyond my professional pursuits, diverse interests add colour to my life, including singing, playing the ukulele, watching films, and finding joy in going to the beach and outdoor running.

I believe in the power of stories and have experienced their impact firsthand in my life. As a 'book' in the #CochraneLondon Library of People, I am eager to engage in conversations and share my life experiences, professional insights, and personal interests.

What have Hogwarts and Sherlock Holmes got to do with teaching EBM? Maria Björklund

I am a librarian at Cochrane Sweden who loves to read. Fantasy and detective stories are my favourite genres and I always enjoy how libraries and librarians are represented in fantasy and detective fiction!  I also am drawn in by how a mystery unfolds and you pick up clues and evidence (of course!) along the way and try to solve the crime or mystery yourself while reading.

I teach evidence-based medicine and refer to Sherlock Holmes and fictional libraries (like Hogwarts) when I am helping students understand evidence-based medicine and systematic data retrieval - it is a successful and engaging tactic.

 So, my reading preferences are sometimes also reflected in my professional work, and I think it is a nice way of engaging students in evidence- based medicine.

 A life-changing treatment decision: hope, fear and a bit of evidence? Sarah Chapman

I’ve had progressive hearing loss throughout my adult life and had got to the point where I was struggling to hear, despite hearing aids. In 2021, I was offered a potentially life-changing treatment, a cochlear implant. This would involve surgery and an irreversible process in which the ‘normal’ mechanism of hearing would be destroyed. People meeting the criteria for a cochlear implant are likely to benefit, but outcomes aren’t guaranteed and whether, how much, and in what ways I would benefit were uncertain. I learned first-hand that how we make treatment decisions in our real, messy lives doesn’t necessarily fit the neat models we see when we read about evidence-based decision-making.

Wikipedia: the world largest encyclopaedia - friend or foe? Jennifer Dawson

Communicating and sharing high-quality and reliable evidence informed information is a passion of mine. I have been working with Cochrane as our Wikipedian-in-Residence since 2016. The viewership of medical articles on English-language Wikipedia alone surpasses 2 billion page views per year and there are about 40,000 articles that relate to human health. 

In 2021, viewership of the main Wikipedia COVID-19-related article was over 500,000 views a month, far more than most of the other sources of information on the internet. Medical content is also available in over 280 languages. 

When I tell colleagues in my field that I help improve medical articles on Wikipedia, I usually get all sorts of interesting questions (and sometimes funny looks)! Why should we be considering Wikipedia? Do you recommend Wikipedia as a resource for people with questions about their health? How hard is it to edit Wikipedia? Many people in medical and evidence-based medicine fields find Wikipedia very frustrating. They are not wrong! There are many, many, articles that need improving and many that share incorrect, missing, or outdated information. It can be hard to jump in as a new editor and navigate conflict of interest and work with a very keen volunteer community of often anonymous editors. Rather than dismiss the ‘World’s Largest Encyclopedia’, why not learn more and potentially help improve what people are accessing!

Careless comms costs lives: battling misinformation on statins Harry Dayantis

 

There are few scientific topics as needlessly controversial as statins. These cholesterol-lowering drugs are prescribed to millions of people worldwide and have underdone countless trials evaluating their benefits and risks. There is an overwhelming scientific consensus that they reduce the risk of heart disease. So why do people get so worked up about them, and why do I care?

I care because my father died of a sudden heart attack overnight when I was at university. He was 49 years old and held national records for long-distance running. The post-mortem revealed that he had heart disease, and he might still be alive today if he’d been diagnosed and treated with statins. The risk has a significant genetic component, and I now take statins myself.

I’ve been involved in communicating many research papers on statins over the past decade, at UCL and Oxford University. I’ve worked with cardiologists and researchers to share the real evidence on statins in an often hostile media environment. It’s important that benefits and harms are communicated accurately so that people can make informed decisions; there is evidence that media scare stories have prevented many people from taking statins, potentially costing thousands of lives.

Accessibility at conferences shouldn’t just be a tick box Emily Messina

Attending or presenting at conferences is often an essential aspect of academic careers. We can share research and network, but let’s be honest, how many of us are mentally exhausted just planning to attend a conference, let alone after its over? Despite the fact that many of us, around 20%, are D/deaf, hard-of-hearing, disabled, and/or neurodivergent, we continue to leave accessibility as an afterthought. We strain to read slides or posters with tiny print, struggle with noise and sensory overload in crowded poster halls, forced to spend energy hunting for accessible paths through the conference space, and miss information that is only presented orally. Aren’t we tired of bare knuckling our way through conferences? Without creating content that's accessible, how can we have our science received, understood, and (importantly) acted on. So, let’s talk, share our experiences, and we can learn from each other better ways to improve accessibility and share our research more effectively.

Storytelling to break down boundaries Wanjiru Mwangi

Step into my world of communications and let me take you on an exciting journey about storytelling and the boundaries it breaks. Since time immemorial, storytelling has been a fundamental part of human connection. And in research, it has helped transcend the rigid confines of data and facts, transforming them into narratives that resonate with human emotions and experiences. Not by distorting truths or oversimplifying the complexities of research, but by transforming the most complex ideas into accessible information for those who truly need or yearn to grasp it. As you read through this, try and imagine the power of a personal story, a memory that resonates deeply, or a song that touches your heart. These diverse mediums of storytelling can foster deeper connections between researchers and their audience, leading to a more informed and enlightened public. So come chat with me, Wanjiru, a communications expert in both internal and external communications.

 Don't miss out on this exhilarating opportunity to engage with living stories. No pre-registration for Colloquium attendees is required; simply join us on the event day!

Library of People: Connecting Through Stories
Wednesday, September 6th
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Level 1, Pickwick

In addition to this Library of People event, we invite you to bring used books to Level 1 throughout the event. There will be a free book exchange table where you can pick up your next great read! 

Find out more about the Colloquium:

Get in touch: colloquium@cochrane.org

Thursday, August 17, 2023
Muriah Umoquit

Cochrane seeks Learning and Support Officer - remote

6 months 3 weeks ago

Specifications:  Fixed term maternity leave cover (through May 2024)
Salary: £43,000 Pro-rated 0.6 FTE (though 0.4 FTE will be considered)
Location: Remote - Candidates from the UK, Germany and Denmark with fixed-term employment contract. Candidates from the rest of the world with fixed-term consultancy contract.
Closing date: 20 Aug 2023
 
Cochrane is an international charity. For 30 years we have responded to the challenge of making vast amounts of research evidence useful for informing decisions about health. We do this by synthesising research findings and our work has been recognised as the international gold standard for high quality, trusted information.

Cochrane's strength is in its collaborative, global community. We have 110,000+ members and supporters around the world.” Though we are spread out across the globe, our shared passion for health evidence unites us. Our Central Executive Team supports this work and is divided into five directorates: Evidence Production and Methods, Publishing and Technology, Development, and Finance and Corporate Services.

The Learning and Support Officer will play a central role in revising and updating the Learning Team’s portfolio of author training materials, as Cochrane methods and processes change and evolve over the coming months. The Learning and Support Officer will also coordinate activities of the Cochrane Trainers’ Network, including communicating with the Network about updates to training materials and organizing train the trainers’ sessions for trainers from across the Cochrane Community. Given the geographically dispersed nature of Cochrane authors and trainers, this learning and support will be delivered remotely.

This role is part of the Learning Team, which is responsible for providing learning materials and training for Cochrane staff, authors, and users of Cochrane evidence. The team sits within the wider Membership, Learning and Support team, which strives to ensure that Cochrane recruits, develops and retains high quality contributors to participate in our work by providing a comprehensive service to engage new contributors, reward and develop existing contributors and support all members of our community when they need help.

Don’t have every single qualification? We know that some people are less likely to apply for a job unless they are a perfect match. At Cochrane, we’re not looking for “perfect matches.” We’re looking to welcome people to our diverse, inclusive, and passionate workplace. So, if you’re excited about this role but don’t have every single qualification, we encourage you to apply anyway. Whether it’s this role or another one, you may be just the right candidate.

Our organization is built on four core values: Collaboration: Underpins everting we do, locally and globally. Relevant: The right evidence at the right time in the right format. Integrity: Independent and transparent. Quality: Reviewing and improving what we do, maintaining rigour and trust.  

You can expect: 

  • An opportunity to truly impact health globally  
  • A flexible work environment  
  • A comprehensive onboarding experiences
  • An environment where people feel welcome, heard, and included, regardless of their differences

Cochrane welcomes applications from a wide range of perspectives, experiences, locations and backgrounds; diversity, equity and inclusion are key to our values.

How to apply

  • For further information on the role and how to apply, please click here.
  • The deadline to receive your application is 20th Aug, 2023.
  • The supporting statement should indicate why you are applying for the post, and how far you meet the requirements, using specific examples. 
  • Read our Recruitment Privacy Statement
Monday, August 7, 2023 Category: Jobs
Lydia Parsonson

Get ready for #CochraneLondon: Top tips from the Cochrane Community

6 months 3 weeks ago

Cochrane UK is gearing up to host the much-anticipated Cochrane Colloquium at London's Queen Elizabeth II Centre (QEII) from September 4th to 6th, 2023. The event promises an enriching experience, combining learning, networking, and fun. The countdown has begun, but there is still time to register  

To ensure you make the most out of the Colloquium, we've gathered a selection of insights and suggestions from members of the Cochrane Community. These tips will guide you through multiple days of intense engagement, helping you maintain your well-being, enthusiasm, and collaborative spirit throughout the event. Have other suggestions? Let us know by using the hashtag #CochraneLondon on social media. 


1. Download a Business Card App

Embrace the digital age by adopting a digital business card app. This eco-friendly option enables you to effortlessly exchange contact information, fostering future collaborations.  

"When Cochrane recently attended the 76th World Health Assembly we used blinq.me digital business cards. It was free, easy to set up, and was the main form of business cards that people were using. I hope our Cochrane Community embraces digital business cards as an environmentally conscious choice and helps sets themselves up for future collaborations."

- Catherine Spencer, Cochrane CEO

2. Plan your routes with the Citymapper App

The Colloquium venue is a short walk from tube stations, many hotels, and much more.  The Citymapper app (free) is a really useful tool offering offline navigation to help you get around, including walking, bus, tube and rail routes, ensuring you always know where you’re headed.

" Even as a UK local, I use the Citymapper app and recommend it to anyone coming to London. It can provide accessible route information which is also helpful if you have luggage with you, has live tube and bus information, and is perfect for walking around and exploring without wifi. London has so many great spots to visit before and after the Colloquium - including the Bartholomew Fair events - and I hope having this app will give you the confidence to go out and explore! ”

- Sarah Chapman, Cochrane UK

3. Pack your walking shoes for the Anne Anderson Walk

The Anne Anderson Walk is about 4.5km long and can be completed at your own pace. It will take you past some of the city's most iconic landmarks, give you stunning views of London, and educate you about close-by historical and medical points of interest. Be sure to bring comfortable walking shoes and take advantage of the opportunity to explore London's surroundings while connecting with fellow attendees.

"As the recipient of the 2021 Anne Anderson Award, this walk holds a special place in my heart. It's also a cherished highlight for many Colloquium attendees. While conferences often keep you indoors, the Anne Anderson Walk ensures you truly experience the location. This year, the venue is surrounded by historical sites that showcase London's medical legacy and the significant role of women. Don't forget to bring your walking shoes, contribute to the Anne Anderson Award, and prepare yourself for an enriching experience!"

- Jackie Ho, Cochrane Malaysia

4. Get your official #CochraneLondon merchandise from the Cochrane Store

Select and purchase your limited-edition #CochraneLondon items beforehand. The print-on-demand store offers an exciting range of items, including tote bags, t-shirts, and mugs, which you can choose to purchase for use during the conference or as cherished souvenirs of the event. Please note that these items will not be available for purchase at the Colloquium itself and must be acquired in advance.

"Cochrane is prioritizing sustainability and the environment with this event. Rather than traditional conference swag bags of items you'll never use again, we've taken an eco-conscious route by introducing a print-on-demand store. This not only reduces unnecessary waste but also ensures that participants receive merchandise they truly value and intend to use. I love my Cochrane t-shirt and mug and am excited to see the new items added to the store!  Alongside #CochraneLondon items, there are also ones to celebrate Cochrane's 30th Anniversary items, as we will be celebrating this milestone at the colloquium."

- Sabrina Khamissa, UK

5.  Use the #BetterPoster and #BetterPresentation templates
We worked with the leading research team investigating the accessibility of presentations at academic conferences to create templates for those presenting a poster or doing an oral presentation. Both presenters and attendees will benefit from the use of these templates! 

"I love how evidence-based Cochrane is in so many aspects of their work. Based on the latest research, #CochraneLondon templates makes creating posters and PowerPoint slides so much easier. By adopting these templates, researchers can elevate the impact of their findings, facilitate knowledge transfer, and foster inclusivity within academic conferences. It's going to be exciting to attend a Colloquium with so many using them; attendees will be able to swiftly identify the presentations that align with their interests and it will make it easier for those of us who have English as a second language."

-  Xun Li, Cochrane China


6. Explore the full programme and curate your own Colloquium experience 

Take the time to look through the full Colloquium programme and plan your schedule. Immerse yourself in a captivating lineup of plenary talks, workshops, posters, oral presentations, and meetings that encompass a vast spectrum of topics and issues in evidence-based health care. You can personalize your experience to match your interests and goals!

"The Cochrane Colloquium is more than just a typical academic gathering! It has posters, oral presentations, and a lineup of plenary talks but it goes beyond just academic content! Cochrane Colloquiums are also about building connections and creating unforgettable memories. Be sure to check out all the 'take a break' fun activities and the social gathering at the Natural History Museum!  I encourage all attendees to delve into the comprehensive programme and strike a balance between planned engagements, networking, and enjoyable moments."

- Andrea Moreno, Cochrane France

7. Unite and connect with fellow book lovers! 

Finished a book on the way to the Colloquium and want a new one for the trip home? Have piles of books that could use a loving home? Bring a book for the  #CochraneLondon book exchange! You can also 'sign out' a human book at our Library of People! 

"The love for books at Cochrane extends beyond the Cochrane handbooks! The Cochrane Book Club is hosting a book exchange at the Colloquium. Bring in a book, write your recommendation and a note on a bookmark, and leave with a new book! The book exchange is happening on level 1 over the three days. Book Club members will also be librarians at the Library of People happening in the same area on Wednesday at lunch. We're looking forward to connecting with you over some good books! "

-  Anne-Catherine Vanhove, Cochrane Belgium

8. Mix and Mingle! 
Beyond catching up with colleagues and friends, this event is an opportunity to engage with newcomers interested in our work and potential future collaborators. Embrace the chance to expand your network and foster meaningful connections that could shape exciting collaborations. Stay open to new encounters and the possibilities they bring!

"My best advice: meet and talk to as many people as you can. It's nice to meet colleagues, but everyone at the Colloquium will have an interest in Cochrane’s work and will welcome the chance to share their thoughts and ideas. They may be just the person you are looking for! For me, this approach has given me friends for life spread across the organisation."

-  Elizabeth Royle, UK 


9. Harness the power of social media

While we're meeting in-person, you can also embrace the digital buzz by actively using the event's hashtag; #CochraneLondon.  Through social media, you can connect with other attendees, follow up with presenters, and share your insights with your followers.  

  "You can get ready for Colloquium by sharing the fun badges on your social media to announce to everyone that you will be there! Also, look through the official #CochraneLondon Social Media Ambassadors and give some a follow. Once you're at the Colloquium, be sure to use the official #CochraneLondon hashtag and share your highlights! "

-  Georg Rüschemeyer, Cochrane Germany

10. Make your well-being a priority! 
Cochrane recognizes that conferences can be busy and overwhelming at times. We want to ensure that Cochrane London attendees have the opportunity to prioritize their well-being while also engaging in some fun and social activities. Some people take a break by connecting with others and some people need time to themselves - the colloquium offers space and activities to help meet both of these needs!

"My advice is to treat #CochraneLondon like a marathon, and not a sprint. Every day will be busy, filled with sessions to attend, and people to meet, and it’s important to make the most of this opportunity. But it’s also important to pace yourself and give yourself permission to schedule in proper breaks each day. Take time out for yourself in the Colloquium's 'Quiet Corner', go for the Anne Anderson Walk, or even take some time to go back to your hotel room - especially if it means you are then able to return to the main sessions refreshed and recharged! 

-  Nuala Livingstone, Northen Ireland

Have other suggestions and tips? Let us know by using the hashtag #CochraneLondon on social media.

As you embark on your Cochrane Colloquium journey, we hope that these valuable tips will equip you with the knowledge and confidence to make the most of this enriching experience. We are looking forward to welcoming you to London and uniting the community once again! Don't miss out on this transformative event, where trusted evidence takes centre stage and lasting connections flourish.

Find out more:

Get in touch: colloquium@cochrane.org

Thursday, August 17, 2023
Muriah Umoquit

Cochrane seeks Software Development Team Lead

6 months 4 weeks ago

Specifications: Permanent – Full Time (Hybrid Role, 3 days office and 2 days WFH)
Salary: £60,000 (Paid in DKK, as per market exchange rate) per annum
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
Closing date: Aug 14, 2023
 
Cochrane is an international charity. For 30 years we have responded to the challenge of making vast amounts of research evidence useful for informing decisions about health. We do this by synthesising research findings and our work has been recognised as the international gold standard for high quality, trusted information.

Cochrane's strength is in its collaborative, global community. We have 110,000+ members and supporters around the world.” Though we are spread out across the globe, our shared passion for health evidence unites us. Our Central Executive Team supports this work and is divided into five directorates: Evidence Production and Methods, Publishing and Technology, Development, and Finance and Corporate Services.

As development team lead, you will manage an Agile/Scrum software development team (3 developers, 1 test engineer) who develop web applications that accelerate the production of systematic reviews of health evidence. You will support the team in their work, coordinate with product owners on timelines, and contribute to software testing within the team as needed to ensure sprint goals are met.
 
Don’t have every single qualification? We know that some people are less likely to apply for a job unless they are a perfect match. At Cochrane, we’re not looking for “perfect matches.” We’re looking to welcome people to our diverse, inclusive, and passionate workplace. So, if you’re excited about this role but don’t have every single qualification, we encourage you to apply anyway. Whether it’s this role or another one, you may be just the right candidate.

Our organization is built on four core values: Collaboration: Underpins everting we do, locally and globally. Relevant: The right evidence at the right time in the right format. Integrity: Independent and transparent. Quality: Reviewing and improving what we do, maintaining rigour and trust.  

You can expect: 

  • An opportunity to truly impact health globally  
  • A flexible work environment  
  • A comprehensive onboarding experiences
  • An environment where people feel welcome, heard, and included, regardless of their differences

Cochrane welcomes applications from a wide range of perspectives, experiences, locations and backgrounds; diversity, equity and inclusion are key to our values.

How to apply

  • For further information on the role and how to apply, please click here.
  • The deadline to receive your application is 14th Aug, 2023.
  • The supporting statement should indicate why you are applying for the post, and how far you meet the requirements, using specific examples. 
  • Read our Recruitment Privacy Statement
Tuesday, August 1, 2023 Category: Jobs
Lydia Parsonson

Interventions for preventing and reducing the use of physical restraints in all long-term care settings

7 months ago

Cochrane Review reveals vital role of supportive managers to minimise physical restraint use in care homes

A new Cochrane review finds that the use of physical restraints on care home residents can be reduced without increasing the risk of falls, when frontline care staff are empowered by supportive managers.

Physical restraints are devices that restrict freedom of movement and are frequently used in residential care homes, such as nursing homes and assisted living facilities. Examples are bed rails or belts that prevent residents from getting out of bed unassisted. These restraints are ethically problematic as they are mostly used in people with dementia who are often unable to consent to their use.

Physical restraints are often intended to prevent falls and fall-related injuries. However, the benefits are often small and come with important negative consequences. For example, the restriction of movement can have negative implications on physical functioning and mobility, actually increasing the risk of falls and care dependency. The measures can also trigger or increase fear or aggressive behaviour. For this reason, guidelines and experts recommend avoiding physical restraints in residential care settings.



But how can this be implemented in practice? A Cochrane Review, first published in 2011 and recently updated to reflect the latest research, analyses the scientific evidence on interventions and strategies to reduce the use of restraints. The team of authors, led by Ralph Möhler of the University Hospital Düsseldorf, identified 11 studies with a total of 19,003 participants, evaluating different intervention approaches.

In their evaluation, the authors found the best evidence for organizational interventions, which were investigated in 4 studies with a total of 17,954 participants. Organizational interventions to reduce the use of restraints consist of different components to function as a package. They aim to improve knowledge, skills, and strategies to prevent restraint use among both frontline care staff and managers. In three studies, employees designated as ‘champions’, were trained to develop and implement individual strategies to prevent the use of restraints within their facilities.  Managers supported this, including by relieving them of other activities and provide them with sufficient time for their tasks.

Such interventions probably reduce the number of residents with physical restraints in nursing homes by 14%. There was no overall change in the number of residents with falls or fall-related injuries and there was no increase in the prescription of psychotropic medication. In addition, there was no evidence of adverse effects of the interventions. Based on the study data, the authors calculated that the number of residents with physical restraints could be reduced from 274 to 236 per 1000 individuals, if such interventions were implemented. Focusing on changes on the organisational level seems to be important for achieving long-term effects.

Six studies examined educational interventions addressing staff knowledge and attitudes regarding the use of restraints. The results of these studies were inconsistent and some of the studies had methodological limitations. Therefore, no clear conclusion on the effects of educational interventions can be drawn.

"The results of this review show that physical restraints in nursing homes can be reduced without increasing falls or fall-related injuries,” Ralph Möhler, lead author of the review.

“There is no evidence in the reviewed studies that psychotropic medications were prescribed more often. However, education for frontline staff alone doesn’t seem to be enough; the support of care home managers plays a decisive role."

Friday, July 28, 2023
Lydia Parsonson

Blue-light filtering spectacles probably make no difference to eye strain, eye health or sleep quality

7 months ago

Spectacles that are marketed to filter out blue light probably make no difference to eye strain caused by computer use or to sleep quality, according to a Cochrane review of 17 randomised controlled trials of the best available evidence so far. 

Nor did the review, led by authors from the University of Melbourne and published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, find any evidence that blue-light filtering lenses protect against damage to the retina, the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye.

Blue-light filtering lenses, also known as blue-light blocking spectacles, have been increasingly prescribed or recommended, often by opticians, since the early 2000s. An Australian survey-based study in 2018 found that, of the 372 optometrists who responded, 75% prescribed these lenses despite acknowledging limitations in the evidence to support their use.  

The Cochrane Eyes and Vision team set out to assess the effects of blue-light filtering lenses compared with non-blue-light filtering lenses for improving visual performance, providing protection to the retina and improving sleep quality. They analysed data from all the randomised controlled trials they could find on the topic and found 17 trials from six countries. Of the 17 trials, 12 were conducted in Australia, the Czech Republic, Japan, Norway, the USA and the UK. Five studies did not report the country in which the trial was conducted. Most of the studies were published after 2010, suggesting a growing research interest in blue-light filtering lenses over the past decade. The numbers of participants in individual studies ranged from five to 156, and the period of time over which the lenses were assessed ranged from less than one day to five weeks.

The senior author of the review is Associate Professor Laura Downie, Dame Kate Campbell Fellow and Head of the Downie Laboratory: Anterior Eye, Clinical Trials and Research Translation Unit, at the University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

She said: “We found there may be no short-term advantages with using blue-light filtering spectacle lenses to reduce visual fatigue associated with computer use, compared to non-blue-light filtering lenses. It is also currently unclear whether these lenses affect vision quality or sleep-related outcomes, and no conclusions could be drawn about any potential effects on retinal health in the longer term. People should be aware of these findings when deciding whether to purchase these spectacles.”

However, the quality and duration of the studies also needs to be considered, she said. 

“We performed the systematic review to Cochrane methodological standards to ensure the findings are robust. However, our certainty in the reported findings is limited by the quality of the available evidence. The short follow-up period restricted our ability to consider potential longer-term outcomes.”

The first author of the review, Dr Sumeer Singh, a postdoctoral research fellow in the Downie Laboratory, said: “High-quality, large clinical research studies with longer follow-up in more diverse populations are still required to ascertain more clearly the potential effects of blue-light filtering spectacle lenses on visual performance, sleep and eye health. They should examine whether efficacy and safety outcomes vary between different groups of people and using different types of lenses.”

The review did not find any consistent reports of adverse side effects from using blue-light filtering lenses. Any effects tended to be mild, infrequent and temporary. They included discomfort wearing the spectacles, headaches and lower mood. These were likely to be related to the wearing of spectacles generally, as similar effects were reported with non-blue-light filtering lenses.

Prof. Downie said: “Over the past few years, there has been significant debate about whether blue-light filtering spectacle lenses have merit in ophthalmic practice. Research has shown that these lenses are frequently prescribed to patients in many parts of the world, and a range of marketing claims exist about their potential benefits, including that they may reduce eye strain associated with digital device use, improve sleep quality and protect the retina from light-induced damage. The outcomes of our review, based on relatively limited data, show that the evidence is inconclusive and uncertain for these claims. Our findings do not support the prescription of blue-light filtering lenses to the general population, and these results are relevant to a broad range of people, including eye care professionals, patients, researchers and the broader community.”

The potential mechanisms by which blue-light filtering lenses might be able to help with eye strain, sleep and protecting the retina are not known. One rationale for claims about the benefits of these lenses is that modern digital devices such as computers and smart phones emit more blue light than traditional lighting sources, and are being used for longer, and closer to bedtime. 

Dr Singh said: “The amount of blue light our eyes receive from artificial sources, such as computer screens, is about a thousandth of what we get from natural daylight. It’s also worth bearing in mind that blue-light filtering lenses typically filter out about 10-25% of blue light, depending on the specific product. Filtering out higher levels of blue light would require the lenses to have an obvious amber tint, which would have a substantial effect on colour perception.”

Monday, August 21, 2023
Muriah Umoquit

#CochraneLondon: A trailblazing conference prioritizing sustainability and environmental considerations

7 months ago

Cochrane UK is proud to host Cochrane’s Colloquium at the Queen Elizabeth II Centre (QEII) in London, UK from 4-6 September 2023. The countdown has begun, but there is still time to register and be part of this enriching experience! 

We spoke with Sabrina Khamissa, Cochrane's Event Support Officer, who shares the measures taken to create an environmentally responsible Colloquium. 

A central location with many transportation options
Hi Sabrina, we're thrilled about Cochrane's upcoming in-person event in London, UK, and the central location you've chosen is truly exciting. Can you share some insights into how the location was selected and its significance in terms of environmental considerations?

"Certainly! When deciding on the location for #CochraneLondon, we took several factors into account, including our community's geographical distribution. Since a substantial portion of our attendees are based in Europe, hosting the conference in the UK made sense as it encourages participants to opt for more sustainable travel options, particularly trains, which can significantly reduce the event's overall carbon footprint.

London was an ideal choice for its vibrant atmosphere and outstanding public transportation links. By placing the conference at the heart of the city, we aimed to minimize the need for private vehicles and promote the use of eco-friendly transportation alternatives. The venue's close proximity to multiple tube stations and pedestrian-friendly surroundings provides attendees with ample opportunities to choose greener commuting options. We invite all attendees to participate in the Anne Anderson Walk and see the many spots of medical history and London landmarks that are just steps away from the venue."

Sustainability at the heart of the venue choice
The Queen Elizabeth II Centre, where the Colloquium is set to take place, indeed appears to be a fantastic location. Can you elaborate on what specifically drew you to this venue and how its commitment to sustainability aligns with Cochrane's environmental goals?

"When looking at venues we had a checklist of specific requirements, placing a strong emphasis on environmental stewardship and a formal sustainability policy. The Queen Elizabeth II Centre stood out as an exceptional choice, impressing us with its diverse green initiatives aimed at ensuring minimal ecological impact. These initiatives encompass responsible waste management, energy-efficient systems, water conservation efforts, and even hosting 10,000 bees on the fourth-floor area—an inspiring commitment to urban biodiversity.

 

Attendees will see our venue choice play out in very practical ways. The Centre's strategic location allows easy accessibility, with the majority able to walk or use public transportation from their hotels. Moreover, we are dedicated to reducing single-use plastic, eliminating items like cups and straws during the event. By incorporating LED motion-sensitive lighting and maximizing natural light, energy conservation is prioritized. In our efforts to minimize paper usage, we will be using lots of digital signage ver printed signs, contributing to a more sustainable and eco-conscious conference experience for everyone at #CochraneLondon."

Delicious and environmentally friendly food choices
No matter the event, food selection and taste is always something attendees comment on afterwards. Is this something that was considered?

"It was! We understand that the dining experience is a significant aspect of any in-person event, and we wanted to ensure that attendees not only enjoyed delicious meals but also made environmentally conscious choices. The venue has a British-first policy for sourcing ingredients, to support local farms and growers but also to make sure they are using seasonal produce and are reducing carbon footprints.  Only fair-trade coffee and teas are served. And we have taken a step further by selecting a menu that emphasises plant-based meals and are going with 'bowl food' which helps reduce waste.

Rest assured, the taste and quality of the meals served at #CochraneLondon are of paramount importance to us, and we have thoughtfully selected food options that not only delight the taste buds but also align with our commitment to environmental responsibility."



A shift from traditional swag bags and branded items
It's really reassuring that a lot of thought has gone into many aspects of the venue and experience that are environmentally conscious. One typical aspect of an academic conference is swag or branded items that they get at the start of the conference. What can attendees expect?

"Rather than traditional swag bags, we've taken an eco-conscious route by introducing a print-on-demand store. This innovative approach allows attendees to curate their own experience by selecting and purchasing limited-edition Cochrane items beforehand. This not only reduces unnecessary waste but also ensures that participants receive merchandise they truly value and intend to use. The print-on-demand store offers an exciting range of items, including tote bags, t-shirts, and mugs, which attendees can choose to purchase for their convenience during the conference or as cherished souvenirs of the event.

Even the smallest details have been thoughtfully considered from an environmental perspective. When attendees arrive at the registration desk, they will receive a lanyard and name badge. Here, too, we have opted for a sustainable approach, providing recyclable name badges that will be printed on location. This decision further minimizes our ecological footprint while ensuring that attendees can proudly display their identification throughout the conference in an eco-friendly manner."


We hope you enjoyed this insightful glimpse into #CochraneLondon's integration of sustainability. By showcasing how even the simplest choices can culminate in a profound impact, the Cochrane Colloquium sets a noteworthy example for fostering greener and more responsible event experiences worldwide. 

Join us at #CochraneLondon as we unite to propel our shared vision and build a more sustainable world, advancing together for trusted evidence. See you there!

Monday, July 31, 2023
Muriah Umoquit

Get ready for the 2023 Cochrane Colloquium: view the full programme and build your schedule

7 months 1 week ago

Cochrane UK is proud to be hosting Cochrane’s Colloquium at the Queen Elizabeth II Centre (QEII) in London, UK from 4-6 September 2023. The countdown has begun, but there is still time to register and be part of this enriching experience! 

You can now explore the full programme and curate your own Colloquium experience. Take advantage of this opportunity to select the sessions you're most eager to attend and tailor your schedule to your needs and interests. Though it won't guarantee you a seat, it will help us allocate the bigger rooms for the most popular sessions. Once you have picked your sessions, you can add your chosen session to your Apple, Google, or Outlook calendar.

With the theme “Forward together for trusted evidence”, the 2023 Cochrane Colloquium is set to be a groundbreaking event, uniting individuals from diverse backgrounds in a journey of learning, networking, and unforgettable experiences. Immerse yourself in a captivating lineup of plenary talks, workshops, posters, oral presentations, and meetings that encompass a vast spectrum of topics and issues in evidence-based health care.

The colloquium isn't just about the academic content – it's about building connections and creating unforgettable memories. Engage in enriching networking events, ‘take a break’  with some fun social activities, and discover the wisdom of human 'books' at our thought-provoking Library of People. You'll also have the chance to join your colleagues and new Colloquium friends at an unforgettable social gathering at the iconic Natural History Museum. This event truly has something remarkable for everyone!



"Cochrane Colloquiums are more than just an academic gathering; they are a celebration of progress, collaboration, and camaraderie," says Sabrina Khamissa, Cochrane's Event Support Officer.  "The #CochraneLondon program is a testament to this spirit, offering a diverse and engaging lineup of sessions led by some of the most prestigious experts globally. From groundbreaking methodology in evidence synthesis to insightful discussions on knowledge translation, there's something for everyone. We are thrilled to welcome you all to this transformative experience that will shape the future of Cochrane and evidence-based healthcare on a global scale. Together, let's forge ahead for trusted evidence and make a lasting impact on the world of healthcare!"

As anticipation builds, we can't wait to welcome you to London and unite the community once again! Don't miss out on this transformative event, where trusted evidence takes center stage and lasting connections flourish.

Find out more:

Get in touch: colloquium@cochrane.org

Tuesday, July 25, 2023
Muriah Umoquit

Connect, learn, and thrive: Students and early career professionals set for an inspirational experience at #CochraneLondon

7 months 1 week ago

Cochrane UK is hosting Cochrane’s Colloquium at the Queen Elizabeth II Centre (QEII) in London, UK from 4-6 September 2023. With the theme “Forward together for trusted evidence”, the 2023 Cochrane Colloquium is set to be a groundbreaking event with a mix of learning, networking, plenary speakers; a unique and memorable experience at one of London's most renowned venues.

At Cochrane, nurturing aspiring minds and supporting professionals embarking on their career journey is part of the work we do. Our commitment is evident through initiatives like the Cochrane Early Career Professionals Network, Cochrane US Mentorship,  Cochrane International Mobility, and the student pathway to Cochrane Membership. Among these opportunities, the Cochrane Colloquium stands out as an inspirational experience not to be missed. This three-day event provides an enriching platform to learn, connect, and grow. Delve into a diverse range of sessions and engaging activities, fueling your knowledge and expanding your professional network in the world of evidence-based healthcare.

Exciting sessions relevant to students and early career professionals: 

  • Putting evidence into practice - A satellite event for students and healthcare professionals: A half-day event on the Sunday ahead of the Colloquium. Learn about Cochrane Reviews, evidence-based practice, fraudulent research and trustworthy evidence. This interactive event is for students and healthcare professionals from any healthcare discipline that feels there is a gap in their current skill set. You may register just for this event or add this event to your colloquium experience. 
  • Meet the Cochrane CEO and Editor-in-Chief - Networking doesn't get any more exciting than this! Meet some of the top people in Cochrane, ask questions, and interact in a casual environment. 
  • Meet the Author Journey Lead - Find out more about how to propose a new or updated review, and what the topic experts that consider proposals are looking for.
  • Forward Together: new ways to participate in Cochrane - Learn about all the many ways you get in involved in Cochrane's ecosystem!
  • Cochrane-Wikipedia Initiative - Join this hands-on workshop to help improve the health content that people are accessing online.
  • Interpreting systematic review findings - Join this small-group workshop to learn about how to translate research and support decision-making in health care. 
  • Library of People - Just like a regular library where you check out books, come along to speak to someone you wouldn’t normally meet and listen to their story.

This is just a small section of the diverse programming offered at Cochrane London. There are plenty of short oral sessions, longer plenary sessions, posters, social events, and workshops. Over three days you will be able to immerse yourself in the latest advancements in systematic review methodology and network with the leading experts in evidence-based medicine. 

Don't miss out on this unique opportunity to be part of Cochrane's Colloquium and contribute to the pursuit of trusted evidence. Register today and let's move forward together towards a healthier future! 

Cochrane Colloquium
4-6 September 2023
London, UK
Registration fees with information about student discount and one-day registration
Full programme

 

Tuesday, August 1, 2023
Muriah Umoquit

#CochraneLondon brings ‘posh bash’ to iconic Natural History Museum

7 months 1 week ago

Cochrane UK is hosting Cochrane’s Colloquium at the Queen Elizabeth II Centre (QEII) in London, UK from 4-6 September 2023. With the theme “Forward together for trusted evidence”, the 2023 Cochrane Colloquium is set to be a groundbreaking event with a mix of learning, networking, plenary speakers; a unique and memorable experience at one of London's most renowned venues. On the evening of Tuesday, September 5th, delegates will gather at the iconic Natural History Museum in South Kensington, for an extraordinary social event.

After the museum closes its doors to the public, Cochrane Colloquium attendees will be granted exclusive access to the main entrance area, Hintze Hall. This hall has dramatic Romanesque arches and a majestic staircase. You’ll have the opportunity to explore the surrounding museum specimens in the Hall and dance beneath the suspended 25-meter blue whale skeleton named ‘Hope’.

In the spirit of giving back, Cochrane Colloquium organizers have requested a £15 donation during registration, to be given to St. Mungo's, a national charity based in London that works to prevent homelessness and aid individuals in their journey to recover from it. By encouraging donations, we hope to minimize non-attendance and food waste, while positively impacting the community.

"One of the most anticipated aspects of every Cochrane Colloquium is the opportunity to gather with colleagues, share laughter, and dance the night away,” says Martin Burton, Director of Cochrane UK. “We are excited to host this year's social event at the Natural History Museum, which sets the stage for an unforgettable evening. Prepare to be captivated by the perfect blend of British charm, vibrant UK music, and the sheer delight of coming together with colleagues. We are confident that this year’s social event will create cherished memories for all who join us!"

The dress code is slightly ‘posher’ than the conference – so deerstalker hats and fascinators are welcome! Attendees will enjoy some delicious bowl food and canapés while the dance floor beckons. Embracing the tradition of previous Colloquiums, participants will sway to music representative of the host country. UK is rich in music tradition, from regency ballroom Contra Dancing to British punk rock. No prior dance experience is necessary; simply join in the fun on the dance floor!

Attendees can look forward to immersing themselves in the rich history and grandeur of the venue, enjoying the vibrant atmosphere, and creating lasting memories alongside colleagues from around the world. To get attendees excited and ready to dance the night away, an exclusive Spotify playlist has been created for #CochraneLondon. You can also contribute your favourite UK songs on social media using the event's official hashtag, #CochraneLondon. 

Cochrane Colloquium Social Event 
Tuesday 5 September 2023
7:30 pm
Natural History Museum
Address: Cromwell Rd, South Kensington, London SW7 5BD, UK
Provided: Bowl food, canapés, desserts, drinks
Dress Code: posh/spiffy casual
Guests: If you would like to bring guests, you’re welcome to buy additional tickets at £75 each (including VAT). To do so, please email registration@cochrane.org and let them know how many extra tickets you would like.

•       Visit the Colloquium website

Friday, July 28, 2023
Muriah Umoquit

News from Cochrane UK

7 months 1 week ago

Founded 30 years ago in Oxford, Cochrane UK was Cochrane’s first geographic group. Cochrane now has over 130 such groups across the world, working in-country to support the production, dissemination and use of evidence to guide decision-making in health and care.

In March 2024, Cochrane UK’s current contract with the National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR), hosted by the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, will come to an end. As a result, Cochrane UK will shortly be seeking a new funder and host institution.

Catherine Spencer, Chief Executive of Cochrane, said: “Cochrane UK has been at the forefront of Cochrane throughout its 30 year history and was our first geographic group. Cochrane UK has made an extraordinary contribution to evidence-based health and care, I extend my heartfelt thanks to the incredible team in Oxford – past and present – for all they have done.

“As we look to the future, there is an exciting opportunity for a new institution to host Cochrane UK and help more people to benefit from health and care evidence. We will be reviewing what is needed in the UK before we begin a selection process. But I would encourage anyone interested in hosting Cochrane UK at their institution to get in touch with me in the meantime.”

Last November it was announced that in September 2023, Cochrane UK’s Director, Martin Burton, will be moving to Cambridge to become Master of Sidney Sussex College. This summer, Therese Docherty will take on the role of Acting Director, having managed Cochrane UK’s operations for nine years.

Catherine Spencer said: “Martin’s exceptional leadership at Cochrane UK has been truly inspiring. His dedication to advancing evidence-based healthcare and improving patient outcomes has left an indelible mark on our organization and the broader medical community. He has shown a peerless talent for fostering collaboration, supporting people and driving impactful work. As he embarks on the next chapter, we extend our heartfelt gratitude for his invaluable contributions and wish him all the best with his new role.”

Martin Burton said: “I have thoroughly enjoyed my time as Director of Cochrane UK, in particular for the opportunity it has given me to work with an excellent team here, and with so many wonderful Cochrane contributors in the UK and around the world. Cochrane UK is in safe hands and I look forward to hearing more about Cochrane’s future plans. The world needs high-quality evidence in general, and synthesised evidence in particular, now more than ever before. These are exciting times as Cochrane adapts and flexes to meet the new challenges ahead.”

Wednesday, July 19, 2023
Harry Dayantis

Introducing the new Cochrane Handbook for Diagnostic Test Accuracy

7 months 2 weeks ago

Cochrane is delighted to unveil the fully comprehensive edition of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Diagnostic Test Accuracy. Designed for authors, editors, and researchers involved in Cochrane Reviews and systematic evaluations of test accuracy, this invaluable resource provides an extensive guide encompassing the most advanced methodologies and best practices. Whether you're a novice researcher or a seasoned expert, this groundbreaking Handbook equips you with the latest methodologies and expert tips, serving as an invaluable resource for conducting diagnostic test systematic reviews. This Handbook paves the way for better-informed healthcare choices, propelling us towards a future where the impact of medical tests is fully optimized.



This is Cochrane's second Handbook, following the success of the acclaimed Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Cochrane’s Editor in Chief, Karla Soares-Weiser warmly welcomed today’s launch, "This Handbook is an excellent addition to the Cochrane Handbook collection and represents a hugely collaborative effort from numerous methodologists, authors, and editors across Cochrane. Cochrane systematic reviewers and the evidence-based community now have access to well-respected guidance that will strengthen the skills, knowledge and standards of systematic reviewers of test accuracy across the world."

Under the guidance of the experts in the Cochrane Screening and Diagnostic Tests Methods Group, this Handbook is thoughtfully divided into three comprehensive parts. The first section provides insights into the intricacies of Cochrane Reviews, specifically focusing on diagnostic test accuracy. In the second section, readers are introduced to test accuracy studies, exploring the circumstances in which it may be appropriate to conduct them. The third and final section delves into the methodologies employed in systematic reviews of test accuracy, offering expert guidance on data collection, risk of bias assessment for included studies, and conducting impactful meta-analyses. This holistic approach ensures that readers are equipped with the necessary tools to conduct the systematic review and then confidently present their findings.

The first edition Handbook includes:

  • An introduction to planning a Cochrane Review of diagnostic test accuracy, along with a supplementary protocol template that can be used by Cochrane or non-Cochrane authors.
  • Core guidance on understanding the primary research included in systematic reviews of test accuracy to enable authors to make informed decisions in their review’s design, including the evaluation of medical tests, the design of test accuracy studies and understanding test accuracy measures.
  • New guidance on defining the review question, covering how the review’s objective relates to the population, index tests and target condition and review’s eligibility criteria.
  • Substantial developments on searching for and selecting studies, extracting data and assessing the risk of bias and applicability in included studies, which takes readers step-by-step through what they need to consider and at what point during the review.
  • Brand new guidance on undertaking meta-analysis complements the updated understanding meta-analysis chapter, and includes supplementary code and datasets that you’ll need to complete the analyses in different software.
  • Updated guidance on presenting findings and drawing conclusions.
  • New guidance on writing a plain language summary, including a template that can be used by Cochrane or non-Cochrane authors.

The Handbook has been written by a team of authors and editors, led by Senior Editors Professor Jon Deeks and Professor Patrick M Bossuyt, alongside Associate Editors Mariska Leeflang and Yemisi Takwoingi. Professor Patrick  Bossuyt, Senior Editor of the Handbook, also said, “The new Handbook reflects current best practice based on the latest methods research, and provides the only such comprehensive guide to conducting systematic reviews of test accuracy. We are immensely proud of the collective contributions from the authors, peer reviewers and methodologists who have informed its gestation over the years; we would like to thank them all as we would not have been able to create this Handbook without them.”

Professor Jon Deeks, Senior Editor of the Handbook, said, “Cochrane Reviews of diagnostic test accuracy have a huge impact globally. Cochrane Reviews underpin many clinical guidelines, including World Health Organization ones. Cochrane evidence also informs the WHO Essential Diagnostics List, which covers many areas of infectious disease and addresses the need for countries to make essential diagnostics more accessible and affordable. This new guidance for both new and experienced authors will strengthen our ability to develop highly impactful reviews that make a real difference in people’s lives.”

Don't miss out on this game-changing resource! The online version of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Diagnostic Test Accuracy is available for free, offering immediate access to its wealth of knowledge as a PDF. But for those seeking convenience and a cherished addition to their collection, the physical edition of the Handbook and the E-book is also available.

 

Thursday, July 20, 2023 Category: The difference we make
Muriah Umoquit

Breaking language barriers: Cochrane adds Bahasa Indonesia to translation efforts

7 months 2 weeks ago

With over 198 million speakers globally, Bahasa Indonesia is the official language of Indonesia, the world's fourth most populous country. Recently Bahasa Indonesia has been added along with four other new languages to Cochrane.org and the Cochrane Library. Adding Bahasa Indonesia to the list of 21 languages that plain language summaries are translated in, marks a significant stride in addressing the healthcare information needs of this extensive and diverse population. This inclusion not only breaks linguistic barriers but also empowers individuals to make evidence-informed health decisions globally.

From left to right: Datu Respatika, Lukman Ade Chandra, Kristia Hermawan, Anggraeni Ayu Rengganis (Translation Manager), Afrilia Intan Pratiwi, Alfia Fatma Zaharo, Mawaddah Ar Rochmah, Detty Siti Nurdiati (Director of Cochrane Indonesia), Ajeng Viska Icanervilia.

The addition of the new language addition is due to the strong collaboration between Cochrane Malaysia and Cochrane Indonesia. They have shared a longstanding history of mutual support since their inception and this new Indonesian translation project has deepened that bond between the teams. Cochrane Malaysia has graciously extended their assistance and expertise to support Cochrane Indonesia in establishing their translation project.

“I am particularly happy about it because I feel a part of the project. Malaysia and Indonesia are like siblings, and we try to support each other where we can."

- Prof. Jacqueline Ho, Cochrane Malaysia Co-Director

 

At the outset, Teguh Haryo Sasongko, Cochrane's Malaysia Translation Project Manager, arranged an online meeting with Cochrane Indonesia to outline the management of the Malaysian project and discuss how the team encourages its volunteers. In May of this year, during the Indonesian team's visit to Malaysia, they connected with Nila Pillai (as shown in the above photo; seen in the bottom right sharing with the Indonesian team). Nila has been serving as the Cochrane Malaysia Support Officer and coordinator of Cochrane Malaysia's Malay Translation Project since its inception in 2015. Nila shared insights on how she manages the translation project, highlighting both challenges and successes. The two teams recently collaborated in organizing joint Cochrane training workshops in both countries, with plans for further collaboration in various domains.

“Indonesia has the 4th largest population in the world and even though Malay and Indonesian have some similarities, being able to offer Cochrane evidence in Bahasa Indonesia, Indonesia’s main and official language, marks an important milestone for us."

- Dr. Detty Nurdiati, Cochrane Indonesia Director

Thursday, August 17, 2023
Muriah Umoquit
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